The bigger the hospital the higher the prices

Diagnostic Imaging Services shares an opinion regarding hospital health care costs and sharing one particular reason: “Doctors are fleeing private practices for the security of hospitals, and the exodus will be a disaster for U.S. health care. The bigger hospitals get, the more they can jack up their prices—up to 44 percent higher according to one estimate.” DIS is an … Read More

The eye popping cost of cancer drugs

While Diagnostic Imaging Services is not an organization that provides oncology services, we do screen and perform exams on people who may receive a new diagnosis of cancer, a notification that a previous cancer has returned or is/has received treatment for cancer. For those people, this story from CBS news may ring very true. For those who have not themselves … Read More

An app a day keeps the doctor away?

Imagine a baby boomer’s surprise at leaving their doctor’s office with a prescription for blood pressure medication and instructions to download an app that will help them manage the symptom. Doctors and health care providers are increasingly “prescribing” apps and enlisting the help of smart devices to help manage their patients’ health: a practice called mobile health (mHealth). In today’s … Read More

Three large insurers join forces for health care price transparency

UnitedHealth Group (UNH) Inc., the largest U.S. health insurer, will lead an industry effort to throw a spotlight on the prices paid for health-care services, making their costs available to consumers on the Internet. The effort, organized by a nonprofit called the Health Care Cost Institute, builds on steps the Obama administration has taken to shed light on prices charged … Read More

Drug company says it will stop paying doctors to promote drugs

from the Newe York Times, published December 17, 2013: December 16, 2013 — The British drug maker GlaxoSmithKline will no longer pay doctors to promote its products and will stop tying compensation of sales representatives to the number of prescriptions doctors write, its chief executive said Monday, effectively ending two common industry practices that critics have long assailed as troublesome … Read More

Hospitals buying more doctors’ practices

The below is an article published online by USA Today, regarding the trend found in the South Carolina area. Another reason hospitals are employing more doctors is to get their referrals, said Lynn Bailey, a health care consultant in Columbia, S.C. Having the physicians as well as home-health agencies, transportation, rehabilitation, medical equipment and other services makes hospitals the dominant … Read More

Need to see the doctor? You may have company on your next visit…

Shared medical appointments, or group visits, are becoming a popular — and possibly more satisfying — way to see the doctor. But they do require divulging and discussing private medical information in front of strangers (albeit ones who have signed waivers not to talk about other patients’ medical histories outside of the visit). And while that makes some people understandably … Read More

More Doctors Steer Clear of Medicare

By Melinda Beck | The Wall Street Journal Fewer American doctors are treating patients enrolled in the Medicare health program for seniors, reflecting frustration with its payment rates and pushback against mounting rules, according to health experts. The number of doctors who opted out of Medicare last year, while a small proportion of the nation’s health professionals, nearly tripled from … Read More

Millions can’t afford to go to the doctor

The number of working-age adults in 2012 who skipped needed care because of cost: Did not visit a doctor: 53 million Did not fill a prescription: 50 million Skipped recommended care: 49 million Some 80 million people, around 43% of America’s working-age adults, didn’t go to the doctor or access other medical services last year because of the cost, according … Read More

Patient-centered care linked to better outcomes

Patients tend to do better when their doctors pay attention to their individual needs and circumstances, according to a new study. Previous studies had suggested that patient-centered care led to better outcomes, but it was hard to know what doctors were talking about with patients. Researchers didn’t know – for example – whether doctors simply increased patients’ medications when their … Read More

President’s 2014 budget takes on self-referral

April 11, 2013 — In its 2014 budget plan released April 10, the Obama administration has directly targeted self-referral, proposing that certain imaging services be excluded from the in-office ancillary services exception to the federal Stark law. Not only does the proposal address self-referral directly for the first time, it quantifies the savings that would be gained by closing this loophole … Read More

Doctor-Owned Hospitals Prosper Under Health Law

Kaiser Health News — Doctor-owned hospitals are earning many of the largest bonuses from the federal health law’s new quality programs, even as the law halts their growth. The hospitals, many of which specialize in heart or orthopedic surgeries, have long drawn the ire of federal lawmakers and competitors. They say physicians often direct the best-insured and more lucrative cases to … Read More

The Obamacare Revolt: Will it make a difference?

D.I.S. shares an article on a look at “what it would be like to go to the doctor without massive government interference in health care” through the eyes of one Kansas physician. http://reason.com/archives/2013/03/13/the-obamacare-revolt-physician-fight-bac?goback=%2Egde_966657_member_223251911