Diagnostic Imaging Services performs screening and diagnostic mammograms at our Metairie – Veterans Memorial Boulevard, Marrero – Avenue C, Slidell and Covington – Highway 21 locations. At each of these facilities, we also off the 3D mammography option.

During the month of October, DIS offer a special screening mammogram price of only $99. This price special is valid starting October 1 and ending on October 31, 2018.

DIS offers a $99 screening mammogram special for those without health insurance

Our Women’s & Advanced Imaging Center in Metairie will be open each Saturday during October to offer weekend screenings. If you have about 20 minutes, come see us and our wonderful technologists who will conduct your exam with care and as comfortably as possible.

All we need is about 20 minutes

Call 504-883-5999 or 985-641-2390 for your very own DIS patient experience. Or, click here to send us an email requesting assistance in scheduling a visit.

Certain conditions apply for this pricing special, outlined in the accompanying graphic (above). For women without health insurance coverage, this is a great time to get this important screening. Give the DIS patient financial services department a call for clarifications or for any other related questions. One of our friendly, experienced associates can be reached at 504-459-3220.

This special offer does not include the 3D option of a screening mammogram. If 3D is desired, the total due for the exam will be $159.

What are the breast cancer statistics to consider?

  • About 1 in 8 U.S. women (about 12%) will develop invasive breast cancer over the course of her lifetime.
  • In 2016, an estimated 246,660 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed in women in the U.S., along with 61,000 new cases of non-invasive (in situ) breast cancer.
  • About 2,600 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed in men in 2016. A man’s lifetime risk of breast cancer is about 1 in 1,000.
  • Breast cancer incidence rates in the U.S. began decreasing in the year 2000, after increasing for the previous two decades. They dropped by 7% from 2002 to 2003 alone. One theory is that this decrease was partially due to the reduced use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) by women after the results of a large study called the Women’s Health Initiative were published in 2002. These results suggested a connection between HRT and increased breast cancer risk.
  • About 40,450 women in the U.S. are expected to die in 2015 from breast cancer, though death rates have been decreasing since 1989. Women under 50 have experienced larger decreases. These decreases are thought to be the result of treatment advances, earlier detection through screening, and increased awareness.
  • For women in the U.S., breast cancer death rates are higher than those for any other cancer, besides lung cancer.
  • Besides skin cancer, breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among American women. In 2015, it’s estimated that just under 30% of newly diagnosed cancers in women will be breast cancers.
  • In women under 45, breast cancer is more common in African-American women than white women. Overall, African-American women are more likely to die of breast cancer. The risk of developing and dying from breast cancer is lower in Asian, Hispanic, and Native-American women.
  • In 2016, there are more than 2.8 million women with a history of breast cancer in the U.S. This includes women currently being treated and women who have finished treatment.
  • A woman’s risk of breast cancer approximately doubles if she has a first-degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) who has been diagnosed with breast cancer. Less than 15% of women who get breast cancer have a family member diagnosed with it.
  • About 5-10% of breast cancers can be linked to gene mutations (abnormal changes) inherited from one’s mother or father. Mutations of the BRCA1 andBRCA2 genes are the most common. On average, women with a BRCA1mutation have a 55-65% lifetime risk of developing breast cancer. For women with a BRCA2 mutation, the risk is 45%. Breast cancer that is positive for theBRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations tends to develop more often in younger women. An increased ovarian cancer risk is also associated with these genetic mutations. In men, BRCA2 mutations are associated with a lifetime breast cancer risk of about 6.8%; BRCA1 mutations are a less frequent cause of breast cancer in men.
  • About 85% of breast cancers occur in women who have no family history of breast cancer. These occur due to genetic mutations that happen as a result of the aging process and life in general, rather than inherited mutations.
  • The most significant risk factors for breast cancer are gender (being a woman) and age (growing older).